Published papers

Who am I who teaches? - Published June 2015

 
Picture of Pip Bruce Ferguson
Who am I who teaches? - Published June 2015
by Pip Bruce Ferguson - Sunday, 6 September 2015, 9:22 AM
 

Hi all

I submit my paper for review. Your comments to strengthen the work are appreciated.

Warm regards

Pip

(Edited by Marie Huxtable - original submission Tuesday, 17 March 2015, 2:21 PM)

Picture of Moira Laidlaw
Re: Who am I who teaches?
by Moira Laidlaw - Tuesday, 17 March 2015, 5:23 PM
 

Hi Pip! I am delighted to be offered the chance to review your lovely paper. I have written some comments on the paper itself, some of them merely typographical, others more about how the ideas impact on me as I am reading.

I thoroughly enjoyed the article. It struck me throughout as the work of someone highly committed to living out her values in her practice and becoming accountable for them. The desire to be consistent in terms of aims and outcomes is very engaging to read and always evident. I found the examples you give of working in New Zealand and not grasping the cultural consequences of particular actions at the time particularly telling and moving. They were, for me, the parts of the paper that spoke the loudest. I wanted to stand behind them and urge them forward. Yes!!!

My own work in China brought me up against my own living contradictions in that sense, and I wonder whether in your article allusions to being a living contradiction (Whitehead, 1989) would further ground your work as Living Theory. I know from my own personal experience how instructive the dismantling of a living contradiction in one's own actions can be in terms of improving practice. A living contradiction is a powerful aspect of Living Theory in the sense that it is from a position of discomfort about not living one's values as fully as one wants to, that the impetus to improvement often seems to manifest itself. I feel that's an area that needs to be more explicit in the paper. I wonder what you think about that.

I also largely question your use of 'we' in the paper, which seems to me to be about assumptions being made that cannot necessarily be made authentically. Your use of 'we' seems to me to be rhetorical and I don't think that's sufficient. The 'we' is a crucial way of identifying particular groups and needs in Living Theory - at least in my understanding of it - to be nuanced rather than formulaic. 

I wondered as well whether examples of your practice in Ireland so far might be a powerful help to the reader to grasp the precise nature of your concerns. And this brings me, I think, to the major point I wanted to raise in response to your paper. Near the beginning you list the values, such as caring and respectfulness to others without offering specific insights into the meanings for you of these words. The danger of writing about values as if they can be explained through mere words is a big one. It's tempting because there is an implicit assumption that others will share what you are meaning, but surely it is the precise meanings you give to your values through your practice and reflection on practice that makes them more than simply words on a page. To diminish them to that degree is not, perhaps, to show your own insights and values the caring and respectfulness that you always want to accord to others. It is my contention that values (and words, but that's another story!) are alive as we are alive, and they grow with us (Laidlaw, 1996) and this was the basis for my Ph.D. thesis. If that is the case, then the standards of judgement (the values essentially) we try to articulate in practice over time, both in the actions and the words we use to describe those actions, must be very carefully handled in order to communicate them as living and growing and not just as dead things on a slab of words. I believe it is one of the biggest challenges of Living Theory and living theorising. I ask myself the question always when I am writing a paper: 'How can I maximise the chances for my readers to grasp what it is that truly matters to me in the work I do?'

I love this paper because of the values that are emerging out of it. I would like to see them come out from the shadows a little more, though, in such ways that the reader has an even better chance of identifying precisely what particular values mean to you and could mean to those you work with.

Of course the comments here and on the paper itself represent only my ideas and impressions.

In order for me to recommend publication without hesitation, I think there are three issues I would want you to concentrate on:

1)An explicit avowal of the living contradiction as a helpful insight into how to improve your practice;

2)Toning down of 'we' assumptions, and

3)A more nuanced presentation of those values (like caring and respectfulness) by which you judging the quality of your own work.

I really hope these comments go some way to doing justice to what is potentially a very significant contribution to the journal in terms of its clear exposition of the kinds of concerns that I think many of EJOLTS readers will be able to identify with.

All the best,

Moira Laidlaw, 17.3.15.

Picture of Pip Bruce Ferguson
Re: Who am I who teaches?
by Pip Bruce Ferguson - Wednesday, 18 March 2015, 11:06 AM
 

Dear Moira

Thanks so much for your speedy reply. I think you raise some very valid points. I'll try to track Whitehead's 'living contradiction' material down online, as "The Growth of Educational Knowledge" (which I have at home in NZ and know covers these issues) is not in our library here.

Yes, the 'we' is the terminology that Palmer uses. I will need to make that clearer, and also to go back through and determine where 'we' is appropriate and where I should mainly be talking about 'I'. Thanks for the heads-up on that point.

I am going to need to think carefully about the articulation of values bit. I recently had a paper rejected for being 'too philosophical' for a journal that mainly focused on accounts of practice, as I'd tried to cover both aspects of values, virtues and how these are worked out in practice. I'd obviously not done a sufficiently competent job, from the very helpful feedback of one of the reviewers. So I guess I'm a little diffident about straying too far into the philosophy of values. But I'll see what I can do :-)

Will probably not re-post another iteration until I hear back from Swaroop and Sigrid.

Warm regards

Pip

Swaroop Rawal
Re: Who am I who teaches?
by Swaroop Rawal - Thursday, 19 March 2015, 8:14 AM
 
Dear Pip,

Just got your paper...going to sit down to read it. You will hear from me sooooooon

Love, Swaroop

Picture of Pip Bruce Ferguson
Re: Who am I who teaches?
by Pip Bruce Ferguson - Monday, 23 March 2015, 10:52 AM
 

Thanks so much Swaroop - nice to know you have access. I will wait for your responses before having another attempt, with all reviewer feedback before me.

Hope the work in India is going well. I directed my daughter to your Facebook page accounts of it recently - she works for a charity that focuses on assisting the visually impaired, and they'd drawn on some rather great examples from India in one of their fundraising events recently. I thought she'd be interested in your work.

Warm regards

Pip

Swaroop Rawal
Re: Who am I who teaches?
by Swaroop Rawal - Wednesday, 25 March 2015, 12:37 AM
 

HI Pip, So nice to read about your daughter. Please tell her for me, that if she needs any help I am willing to give it.

Love, Swaroop

Picture of Pip Bruce Ferguson
Re: Who am I who teaches?
by Pip Bruce Ferguson - Thursday, 26 March 2015, 1:58 PM
 

Hi Swaroop - many thanks. I will definitely pass that on. However Sarah is more involved with website design than actual work 'on the ground' but she may know of workers in India for her charity who would appreciate the connection. Let me know if this 'extension of your offer' would be okay.

Love

Pip

Picture of Pip Bruce Ferguson
Re: Who am I who teaches?
by Pip Bruce Ferguson - Sunday, 29 March 2015, 1:55 PM
 

Dear Moira, Swaroop and Sigrid

I have had a thought about how I would like to restructure the next iteration. As you probably all know, one of the things I really REALLY value about EJOLTS is its open reviewing process. I believe it is much fairer and more democratic and respectful than blind reviewing. So what I am proposing, and am seeking your ethical agreement to, is to embed some of the quotes from your respective reviewing comments into the next iteration of the paper. I will then respond to these, and also seek to expand the paper a little to explain WHY I am wanting to do this. Could you let me know, by replying to this, if you agree to my suggestion?

I will copy this message onto each of your review so I can be sure you see it. Thanks so much for considering this possibly unorthodox request.

Love

Pip

Picture of Sigrid Gjøtterud
Re: Who am I who teaches?
by Sigrid Gjøtterud - Friday, 20 March 2015, 12:29 PM
 

Dear Pip,

You, Moira and Jack were the reviewers on my first international paper, a rewarding learning process for me. Now I am the lucky reader of your interesting paper!

I find that it is very well written, and it does inspire me. Why do we write our living theories? For me the most essential reason to read living theory accounts, is to be inspired, to become aware of aspects of my teaching I need to pay attention to, to be touched and to see new ways to stretch my own practice. Your article does all this to me.

One question that has occupied me, one that I have discussed with Marie and Jack, is about the nature of the knowledge created through the living theory accounts. You write towards the end of your conclusion: "I hope this account of my developing practice has provided evidence that I continue to work to ensure that my values....” I think it does, but to me this is not what is most important. What is important to me is how your examples, which are concrete and trustworthy, show HOW you have been, and thus how I/we can be in the process of becoming teachers that are more qualified. This paper is valuable to me because it shows how awareness and self-critique, as well as reading, brought you towards a more just teaching practice, and that inspires me as a teacher and researcher. It inspires because it is concrete and shows some possible ways of doing. Ways I can adapt if not adopt. Hence, the quoted sentence blurs the image a bit for me. To put it very directly, which I hope will not offend you, but rather incite (is that a correct word?) a discussion on the forms of living theory accounts: I don't want to read the article to see the proof of you living your values. Rather, I will read the article to see how you practice when living your values. This I think is well concluded, and therefore I believe the quoted sentence is not nessesarry. You may very well disagree!

I was once advised never to end a chapter or paper with a quote, but rather a statement others might later quote. I kind of like that advice:-)

The last years I have been working a lot in Tanzania. When I started, I was scared, knowing very well that I did not know the culture, and therefore was bound to make unjust errors. So, I too had to ask my students to please tell me when I was doing or saying things that could be offensive or hurtful, and at the same time I know them to be so polite they would never want to hurt my feelings. It is a dilemma. Now, in the teacher education in Norway, I am working closely with a small group of adult learners who have worked for years in various fields of agriculture. In their striving to write academic assignments, learning a new vocabulary etc I have struggled to find ways to support their way into a new "culture”, and find that I encounter challenges similar to the ones you discuss.

I recommend your paper for publication, and even if I don't have clear suggestions for changes to be made, I hope you may answer my thoughts in this space of dialogue.

Warm regards

Sigrid


Picture of Pip Bruce Ferguson
Re: Who am I who teaches?
by Pip Bruce Ferguson - Monday, 23 March 2015, 10:50 AM
 

Hi Sigrid - I am very grateful to you for your prompt reply. I think you raise very valid points which I shall ponder on as I review and resubmit the paper. Not offended at all - indeed, one of the things that I very much value about EJOLTS is the opportunity for critical and sometimes quite robust exchanges between reviewers and authors that I think enable a stronger paper to emerge. And if you have that response to aspects of the paper, so will other readers.

I must admit I wondered about finishing the paper with a quote myself, so I will certainly change that aspect. Yes, I think all of us who practise in countries or with cultural groups quite different from our own, grapple with the conundrum you mention with regard to your work in Tanzania. I do love the way Norwegians are so generous with their time and skills in other countries! A friend of mine from Jolster, now retired from a senior position in local administration, regularly goes to Malawi for the Norwegian government and is helping with the establishment and equipping of schools down there. Sometimes we just have to do what we think is best motivated by our values, even when the 'ice can be thin' while working!

I will save your comments, those of Moira and Swaroop's when these are through, into a document that I'll then keep by me as I revamp the paper for resubmission. Nice to be in touch again!

Warm regards

Pip

Picture of Pip Bruce Ferguson
Re: Who am I who teaches?
by Pip Bruce Ferguson - Sunday, 29 March 2015, 1:55 PM
 


Dear Moira, Swaroop and Sigrid

I have had a thought about how I would like to restructure the next iteration. As you probably all know, one of the things I really REALLY value about EJOLTS is its open reviewing process. I believe it is much fairer and more democratic and respectful than blind reviewing. So what I am proposing, and am seeking your ethical agreement to, is to embed some of the quotes from your respective reviewing comments into the next iteration of the paper. I will then respond to these, and also seek to expand the paper a little to explain WHY I am wanting to do this. Could you let me know, by replying to this, if you agree to my suggestion?

I will copy this message onto each of your review so I can be sure you see it. Thanks so much for considering this possibly unorthodox request.

Love

Pip

Swaroop Rawal
Re: Who am I who teaches?
by Swaroop Rawal - Wednesday, 25 March 2015, 12:34 AM
 

Hi Pip,

The first thought that struck me when I read your paper was what a wonderful person Pip is!...but it is not explicit in your writing...nor is it apparent in the critical incidents you have discussed. I perceive 'critical incidents' a compelling way to show the living contradiction in action.

My initial reaction was ...I would like to read more persuasive incidents and I am sure there are some more powerful ones. However, when I reread your paper I realised it is not about the critical incidents per se but about the internal dialogue which I think should be more unambiguous ...more specific.

I say this because when I read the paper I immediately and naturally put myself in the Maori students' place. I say naturally for two reasons- firstly, because we in India have lived under the British rule and still carry the burden. Secondly, India is country of diversities-cultural, linguistic, racial, caste, and religious. As an Indian you can go anywhere and you will be different! When I go to teach, say, the Adivasi [an umbrella term for a heterogeneous set of ethic and tribal groups considered the aboriginal population of India] I am treated like a westernised teacher from Mumbai. In Gujarat [a state in India] I am treated like an outsider even though I am a Gujarati [a person from the state of Gujarat]because I live in Mumbai.

So coming to the point...my first thoughts were...”there should have been a dialogue here.” Freire  suggests that 'there cannot be dialogue without humility'...and my thoughts are Pip is humble... so what is the problem? I believe what is missing is your explanation, your reflections..in-action and on-action. I know later on you d write about how you tried to learn the Irish ways but if you had shared some of your reflections during the first two critical incidents the explanation of your learning and the reason to learn would be more powerful. Because otherwise, although as a person whose people, who have been under foreign rule, I personally feel the Maori students should have understood your point of view. What is missing on their part is empathetic listening. Some thoughts here...Freire suggests...dialogue requires faith in humanity....  in a dialogue both should have faith in humanity..... Dialogue is a give and take of ideas, a sharing. You cannot dialogue and attempt to impose your own ideas on another. I agree but there are two sides here ... Youcandialogue about their ideas and yours. And 'At the point of encounter there are neither utter ignoramus nor perfect sages; there are only people who are attempting, together, to learn more than they now know.'But I see that only on your side.

I do not believe it is about blowing your trumpet ...it is about being clear, unambiguous, balanced in your successes as in your failures.

In the beginning when you talk about: 'to live out my values of openness, accountability, equity, caring and respectfulness to all in my practice'. I cannot see all these values here I know you but all your readers may not know the Pip I know, making it difficult for them to understand why you used those terms in particular. Can you give evidence?

I loved your paper, you caught me from the beginning, in fact I loved the title.  I started writing the comments on the paper and stopped somewhere because I need to say more. One comment I have written says your words and thoughts are like an arrow that does not merely touch but pierces the heart! Pip I would like to see more of that all through...Pip I would like to see more of you.......

Love, Swaroop


Picture of Pip Bruce Ferguson
Re: Who am I who teaches?
by Pip Bruce Ferguson - Thursday, 26 March 2015, 1:55 PM
 

Wow, Swaroop, you have given me a lot to think about! Thank you for the time you have invested in providing this review. Your comments about clarity with regard to the values I espouse links with Moira's feedback too.

I think it is particularly pertinent that you reflect from the point of view of a country that has been under colonial subjugation - this is an aspect of your review that I definitely need to bear in mind, given our own colonial history.

I am going to add your comments to those of Moira and Sigrid, try 'mindmapping' how I might incorporate the feedback and expand on or change the initial paper, and as soon as I can, upload a further iteration. It's unlikely to be before mid April with the other things I have on my plate at present.

Love 

Pip

Swaroop Rawal
Re: Who am I who teaches?
by Swaroop Rawal - Friday, 27 March 2015, 7:53 AM
 
Best Wishes Pip....I believe you paper is meaningful...

love. Swaroop

Picture of Pip Bruce Ferguson
Re: Who am I who teaches?
by Pip Bruce Ferguson - Sunday, 29 March 2015, 1:56 PM
 

Dear Moira, Swaroop and Sigrid

I have had a thought about how I would like to restructure the next iteration. As you probably all know, one of the things I really REALLY value about EJOLTS is its open reviewing process. I believe it is much fairer and more democratic and respectful than blind reviewing. So what I am proposing, and am seeking your ethical agreement to, is to embed some of the quotes from your respective reviewing comments into the next iteration of the paper. I will then respond to these, and also seek to expand the paper a little to explain WHY I am wanting to do this. Could you let me know, by replying to this, if you agree to my suggestion?

I will copy this message onto each of your review so I can be sure you see it. Thanks so much for considering this possibly unorthodox request.

Love

Pip

Picture of Sigrid Gjøtterud
Re: Who am I who teaches?
by Sigrid Gjøtterud - Monday, 30 March 2015, 2:23 PM
 

Hi Pip,

that sounds like a wonderful idea. 

Happy Easter!

Love from Sigrid


Picture of Pip Bruce Ferguson
Re: Who am I who teaches?
by Pip Bruce Ferguson - Monday, 30 March 2015, 7:39 PM
 

Thanks so much Sigrid. I think I'm going to have a busy Easter, with this paper to work on!

Love

Pip

Picture of Moira Laidlaw
Re: Who am I who teaches?
by Moira Laidlaw - Monday, 30 March 2015, 2:29 PM
 

Hi Pip. I love the idea and would be happy for you to use my comments in any way that seem to you helpful in terms of carrying the paper forward.

Good luck and I really look forward to seeing what transpires.

Love, Moira

Picture of Pip Bruce Ferguson
Re: Who am I who teaches?
by Pip Bruce Ferguson - Monday, 30 March 2015, 7:40 PM
 

Great news, Moira - thanks for getting back so promptly! Back to the drawing board!

Love

Pip

Swaroop Rawal
Re: Who am I who teaches?
by Swaroop Rawal - Tuesday, 31 March 2015, 9:19 AM
 
Yes Pip absolutely Yes.....

Swaroop

Picture of Pip Bruce Ferguson
Re: Who am I who teaches?
by Pip Bruce Ferguson - Tuesday, 31 March 2015, 2:46 PM
 

Thanks SO much Swaroop! A busy Easter coming up, methinks!

Love

Pip

Picture of Pip Bruce Ferguson
Re: Who am I who teaches?
by Pip Bruce Ferguson - Sunday, 5 April 2015, 6:16 PM
 

Dear Swaroop, Sigrid and Moira

I am happy to submit the second iteration of my paper. I have done my best to take your very helpful, supportive, challenging feedback into consideration in the second incorporation. I hope you agree!

Warm regards

Pip

Picture of Moira Laidlaw
Re: Who am I who teaches?
by Moira Laidlaw - Sunday, 5 April 2015, 8:59 PM
 

Dear Pip (and Swaroop and Sigrid). Thank you for submitting your second version of the paper, which I have just read with real pleasure. I had three main concerns last time: about your use of 'we'; 'a lack of integration of living contradictions'; and deliberation on those 'living standards of judgement' or the values by which a Living Theorist wishes their work to be judged.

One of the things that most delights me in this new version is the way you have directly used the comments from reviewers. This shows precisely how you have integrated other people's ideas into your new account and turned it into something creative as well, rather than simply complying with other people's insights: I really sense that you have fully engaged with the ideas and come out with your own synthesis. In addition, and also very excitingly, I think you're pushing forward the ways in which the Open Review system in EJOLTS can both be seen to be working, and develop ideas at the same time. I think this is highly significant.

A couple of lay-out issues that struck me when I was reading through. Quotations longer than 40 words need to be in an 11-point, rather than a 12-point size, and indented from the rest of the text. Quotations (and not the abbreviation, 'quotes' as you've written in a footnote) with fewer than 40 words are written as a part of the sentence in which they are contained, with single quotation marks to distinguish them. 

In addition, I learned a new word from the last sentence: resile! I thought it was a typo so I looked it up! Phew, glad I did! Lovely word! Thanks for that, Pip!

In conclusion, in terms of the three areas I commented on in the first version, I find that you have responded fully this time, and I have no hesitation in recommending to the Editorial Board that this paper is published. I would hope that those small formal aspects detailed above would be sorted out first, though.

I have been really happy to be involved in this process, Pip - and Swaroop and Sigrid too. I find it life-affirming and full of the kinds of values that inspire me in education. Many thanks to you all!

All the best, Moira

Picture of Pip Bruce Ferguson
Re: Who am I who teaches?
by Pip Bruce Ferguson - Sunday, 5 April 2015, 8:18 PM
 

Thank you so much for these kind comments, Moira. I knew I was pushing the boundaries including the reviewers'comments, but they felt to me too rich to be left out.

I shall wait for Sigrid's and Swaroop's comments before addressing the layout and quotation issues and loading up the next iteration.

Warm regards

Pip

Swaroop Rawal
Re: Who am I who teaches?
by Swaroop Rawal - Wednesday, 8 April 2015, 9:33 AM
 

Dear Pip,

I am going to come straight the point and say that it was a pleasure to read the second version of your paper. The explanation of the values you believe in and your learning comes through clearly.

I love the way you have included Moira's, Sigrid's and my comments. I appreciate the thought and the meaning connected to putting in our comments. And not only that I like the tone of your answer. It is in sinc with your values and makes me, the reader, see...believe...appreciate "Pip”.  

What do I mean by that ??! For example when you write in reply to my comment... 'I personally feel the Māori student's should have also tried to understand your point of view'... you say ....'but as this paper is about my awareness of my deficiencies, not theirs, I have not sought to describe any possible deficiencies on their side.' Obviously, you know as I know that the paper is about you. I felt the same when I was writing the comment but you see sometimes one wants to say some things which do not translate well in written words. However, sensitive that you are, you caught the real meaning I wanted to convey  and not mere words and replied perfectly.

I like the few changes you have made like.... "What is the role of one's identity and self-awareness in teaching?” and elsewhere.

You have to correct some typographical errors..... church'.However and also ininstitutions  and Iam and a few more...And like the ones suggested by Moira.

I really enjoyed the process of reviewing your paper, Pip. The revisions and additions in this paper are first-rate.  I also thank Moira and Sigrid for enabling me to learn through the process of reading their letters/ reviews.

I recommend this paper for publishing.

Love,

Swaroop

Picture of Pip Bruce Ferguson
Re: Who am I who teaches?
by Pip Bruce Ferguson - Wednesday, 8 April 2015, 9:46 AM
 

Hi Swaroop

Thanks so much for these latest comments. They are really helpful and congratulations on your sharp eyes in picking up those typos! Will try to ensure I have covered them all in the published version.

As I've reviewed for EJOLTS for years, it has been a most interesting experience for me having my own paper submitted and reviewed. One tries to make one's meaning clear, and it is not until one gets feedback from readers who are encountering the work for the first time that one realises that actually, in parts it's quite deficient! That's been good for me to know.

I am glad that you approved its publication, as did Moira. So did Sigrid, actually, in the first version - so she may not want to come in a second time. I'll check the protocol with Marie before loading up the proofed final.

Love

Pip


Picture of Pip Bruce Ferguson
Re: Who am I who teaches?
by Pip Bruce Ferguson - Wednesday, 8 April 2015, 2:44 PM
 

Dear all (reviewers and Editorial team)

Moira and Swaroop have recommended publication - Sigrid wrote at the end of her first comment, "I recommend your paper for publication, and even if I don't have clear suggestions for changes to be made, I hope you may answer my thoughts in this space of dialogue.". I trust that I have done this and engaged sufficiently with her comments.

Accordingly I upload the final version. A couple of Swaroop's 'proofreading' issues didn't show up in the copy I downloaded from my second iteration on this site. I've noticed this before - sometimes 'glitches' happen when one downloads a document that don't exist in the original. However, I've gone over it carefully so hopefully it will be ready to convert to pdf.

Thank you all for this opportunity to practise what I've been preaching for many years as a reviewer!

Warm regards

Pip

Picture of Sigrid Gjøtterud
Re: Who am I who teaches?
by Sigrid Gjøtterud - Monday, 13 April 2015, 1:18 PM
 

Dear Pip, Moira and Swaroop,

I am so sorry I did not manage to get back to you last week, and you are right - I absolutely already recommended your paper for publication. But I also wanted to read it again:-) I so love what you have done to the paper! I fully support the comments of Moira and Swaroop. I particularly liked Moira's comment ...holes I dug for myself and other believing I was helping people to liberate themselves..." This was so scary to me that I almost did not have the courage to go to Tanzania, but then I have to believe that people through the helplessness and naivety see the true wish of doing good. I truly love the way your paper comes through as inclusional (Alan Rayner) in the way you have responded to our comments. And I particularly now love your conclusion. The paper comes through to me as so much more than a proof of you living your values, it is highly inspirational - I get new ideas of how I can encourage my students to find their voices and influence their surroundings. This is living educational theory that I need for my further education and development as a teacher. Thank you all for the fruitful collaboration! Congratultaions on you valuable paper, Pip!


All the best,

Sigrid

Picture of Pip Bruce Ferguson
Re: Who am I who teaches?
by Pip Bruce Ferguson - Friday, 24 April 2015, 9:39 AM
 

Thanks so much for your kind comments Sigrid. It has been great making a connection with you and your work again and I'm so pleased it has given you an idea or two for your own practice. That's how I think we all get better - constantly staying open to better ways of doing things than we currently know. And I love your 'have to believe that people through the helplessness and naivety see the true wish of doing good'. It is that hope that keeps me going even when I am terrified of getting things wrong.

Warm regards

Pip

petemellett
Re: Who am I who teaches?
by Peter Mellett - Thursday, 16 April 2015, 5:43 PM
 

Pip -

I have been asked by Marie to read your paper and pass on my opinion as to whether it is ready for publication. For me, the answer is 'Yes' - with several exclamation marks afterwards. I have not read any of the other reviewers' responses so I hope the following adds something to what has already been said.

Your paper is a model of its kind. The main text hangs nicely between an enticing abstract at the beginning and a conclusion at the end that rounds off the argument satisfactorily and lets the reader back down to the ground without any sense of puzzlement or dissatisfaction. There are no questions or loose ends left hanging in the air and there is not the slightest hint of 'waffle' or circumlocution. It forms a well-structured and concise developmental journey that is written in a clear and engaging style.

But for me, the main attraction is that the story you tell resonates with mine, although we have followed very different life-paths - and it is that resonance of seeing myself reflected in your text and arguments that is the truly educational aspect of this paper. I should like to be a member of a seminar that met to discuss this paper - I think it has something for everyone and everyone will see aspects of their own experience in it. It has a universal quality - and that shows its contribution to LT - and to my lt.

Finally, through your generosity of spirit, you hint at freedom of thought generating the possibility of something that I had always thought impossible - equity and social justice based on right-wing political values. Now what might that look like?

- Pete

Picture of Pip Bruce Ferguson
Re: Who am I who teaches?
by Pip Bruce Ferguson - Friday, 24 April 2015, 9:42 AM
 

Pete, I'm so pleased that you enjoyed the paper. I'm particularly pleased about your 'not the slightest hint of 'waffle' or circumlocution as sometimes I wonder if I am writing as clearly as I might.

And I'm absolutely delighted that you see some resonance. I know you have had a very interesting life-path yourself.

Warm regards

Pip