Published papers

Submission - How can I encourage my pupils to think critically through collaborative online learning?

 
Donal O' Mahony
Submission - How can I encourage my pupils to think critically through collaborative online learning?
by Donal O' Mahony - Tuesday, 30 December 2008, 10:14 AM
 

Dear all

I attach a copy of my submission to EOLTS for you to consider. I do look forward to your thoughts. I am new to this forum so just a very small piece of background for now. I will update my profile later.

I am a father of two girls aged 10 and 13. My wife is Gillian. We live in Dublin, Ireland.

I am a secondary school teacher and studied with Margaret Farren in Dublin City University  from 2005 - 2007. It was there, I was introduced to living theory. I have just enrolled on a PhD programme with Margaret as supervisor.

That's it for now.

Thanks for everyone's support to bring me to this stage.

Kind regards and a happy 2009.

Donal

Picture of Moira Laidlaw
Re: Submission - How can I encourage my pupils to think critically through collaborative online learning?
by Moira Laidlaw - Tuesday, 30 December 2008, 11:10 AM
 

Hi Donal. I am delighted to see your paper now posted at the site. I know what Ram has already submitted his comments, so those will be posted very soon.

Happy New Year, and good luck with the reviews.

Love from, Moira x

Picture of Shankar Sankaran
Establishing relationship
by Shankar Sankaran - Friday, 2 January 2009, 5:17 AM
 
Dear Donal,

Happy New Year!

I have been asked to review your paper by Moira.

I have skimmed through your paper and found it a very interesting account of using an e-learning platform to improve critical thinking as well as reflect on your own practice. What I plan to do over the next few days is to pose a series of questions - some for clarifications and some for reflection (I liked your categorisation of reflection) and hopefully we will reach the higher levels of reflecting described in your paper and through this process add value to it.

I am a practitioner turned academic and teach post graduate courses in project management at the University of Technology in Sydney (Yes I am about to see the last Cricket test between Australia and South Africa on Sunday. Finally I get to support Australia as we are expected to support the underdogs down under!)

I have an active interest in e-learning and have used Moodle as a student. The platform that we use at our University is Blackboard. I did teach project management using e-learning in the past. I also supervise a Canadian PhD student who is looking at an appropriate model for project management maturity for e-learning projects. Her contention is that establishing an e-learning project at Universities requires new competencies.

I do have a great interest in critical thinking and have a colleague who is a Dewey fan. Even at post-graduate level that we teach in our University getting our students to critically think is an issue that we have to overcome.

I also feel , like you, that in order to connect with younger people we 'baby boomers' need to change. My University recently found that some of the accurate feedback on our teaching is being discussed in 'face-book' with the concerned lecturer completely oblivious to what was being said about him!

I have never been to Ireland but someday I will!

Warm regards

Shankar
Picture of Shankar Sankaran
Time for reflection
by Shankar Sankaran - Friday, 2 January 2009, 9:50 PM
 
Dear Donal,

Following are some questions I have for you to reflect on:

1. Page 2 Section 1.2. para 1 - Why was the 'social rationale' not considered relevant to your context ? You have mentioned social aspects of software and learning at many places in the paper.

2. Page 5 Section 1.6. Why have you singled out 'Moodle'? Could this not have been done with any collaborative learning system? Are there any specific characteristics of Moodle that helped you achieve your outcomes? Or was Moodle picked as it was the software platform used by your school?

3.Page 6 Section 2.1 Last para - The term 'dialogue' has a specific meaning and process. Did you use the dialogue process online? I have been exposed to 'dialogue' sessions face-to-face and am curious to know whether you used a specific process in your forum discussions that rendered it to be a dialogue rather than a series of on-line conversations?

Page 7 Section 2.1.1 This is more of a comment than a question. Recently there has been a great deal of interest in assessing student to prepare them for life mainly in higher education.

See 'Rethinking assessment in higher education: Learning for the longer term' edited by David Boud and Nancy Falchikov published by Routledge in 2007. Professor Ronald Barnett also talks about becoming a 'critical being' in his book. Do you think that we should be preparing students to be 'critical beings'? Should our assessments be focused on teaching life skills? You may like to explore this in your PhD.

Page 8 Sec 2.2 Why does Lumby conclude that the need for working collaboratively is particularly relevant to the 21st century? Hasn't this movement been evolving fo some time?

Page 10 Sec 2.3 Para 1 'Society of equals' in what way? In knowledge or thinking? The term equals could have multiple meanings.

Page 11 Sec 3.2 I think it may be useful to point out that there were three cycles in your action plan. Were they deliberately planned as three cycles or did they evolve as you started reflecting on your learning? If not at Sec 3.2 they could be mentioned at the start of section 4.2. on page 14.

Page 16 Section 4.2 Para 1 - Were the students allowed to post anonymously? Did this give them more freedom to express their opinions?

Page 16 Section 4.2. Para 2 - What made you realise that you were becoming more responsive to to your own learning? Was this based on your reflections in your journal? Do you think it would be good to include a quote here from your journal?

Page 18 Section 4.3 Last but one para - Similar question to the last one? How did you conclude that some crtical thinking was taking place?

Page 19 Section 4.4 Last para - Evidence of student learning to support your claim.

Page 20 Section 4.5 First para - What different ways did you use technology besides the discussion forums?

Page 20- Section 4.6 You mention a few people besides your supervisor? Were these your co-researchers? Or were the students your co-researchers? This is not very clear. Perhaps this is my ignorance of the use of action research in education. My experience of AR is mainly in organizations where the people affected by the problem become co-researchers.

Now for my big question:

I go back to your research question where you ask how can you use technology (in the form of a collaborative learning environment) to improve your practice and encourage your pupils to think critically? My question is how did technology make a difference in helping students to think critically? Could what you achieved, through Moodle, not be achieved in a face-to face situation in a class room? What difference did technology make besides being a convenient and interesting tool to use? Would students be motivated to express their opinions more freely when they are not in the presence of a teacher?

I think the paper makes a very useful contribution to knowledge in several areas associated with teaching and to the 'living theory' using action research.

My recommendation is:

2) ACCEPT with modification - But needs further work as indicated in the review;

Warm regards

Shankar






Donal O' Mahony
Re: Time for reflection
by Donal O' Mahony - Friday, 2 January 2009, 3:56 PM
 

Hi Shankar

Thank you for giving me of your time....

I have just quickly read through you comments, suggestions and your big question. I will give these consideration over the weekend and then respond to you through the forum.

Regards

Donal

Donal O' Mahony
Re: Establishing relationship
by Donal O' Mahony - Friday, 2 January 2009, 3:49 PM
 

Hi Shankar

thank you for agreeing to review my paper. This whole process is new to me and one that I think we all learn from.

Cricket is not huge in Ireland but I do happen to live ten minutes walk from one of Ireland's top clubs! Clontarf traditionally was an area where cricket was played. This win, however did get a lot of attention last year!

Critical- thinking is a challenge at all levels in education - its to enable the dialogue to take place that is the challenge - web 2.0 technologies may encourage this!

I look forward to your questions...............

Thanks again

Donal

Picture of Shankar Sankaran
Re: Establishing relationship
by Shankar Sankaran - Friday, 2 January 2009, 9:51 PM
 
Dear Donal,

Take your time to review my suggestions and questions.

I am as new as you are to this open process. So let us enjoy the experience and learn from it together.

I am looking forward to be at the last test match tomorrow as it will turn out to be more of a mind game and I am sure there will be twists and turns.

I have corrected some typos and errors in my last post

Warm regards

Shankar
Donal O' Mahony
Re: Establishing relationship
by Donal O' Mahony - Friday, 9 January 2009, 7:14 PM
 

Hi Shankar and all

The following are some reactions to and reflections on what Shankar raised in his response to my article for consideration in EJOLTS.

I am awaiting comments from another reviewer and will resubmit my paper when I have had time to consider his thoughts also.

Shankar you took a lot of time with my paper. These are my responses:

Shankar wrote 1. Page 2 Section 1.2. para 1 - Why was the 'social rationale' not considered relevant to your context ? You have mentioned social aspects of software and learning at many places in the paper.

Donal’s response There are many rationales for the use of ICT and Hawkridge et al (1990) would have written about the social rationale as demystifying the importance of computers in school. I remember discussing this very aspect with one of the participants in my Master’s class, Teresa Hennessy and how we came to the conclusion that technology was now ubiquitous for many young people and that demystification was not as relevant in the early 21st century.

In the original article I say “Two rationales are particularly relevant to my context”. That does not dismiss other rationales as such. Perhaps â€especially’ rather than â€particularly’?

Shankar wrote 2. Page 5 Section 1.6. Why have you singled out 'Moodle'? Could this not have been done with any collaborative learning system? Are there any specific characteristics of Moodle that helped you achieve your outcomes? Or was Moodle picked as it was the software platform used by your school?

Donal’s response Good point – Moodle was the online environment in Dublin City Uunversity and the one DCU served to school for me during my studies. Moodle subsequently was the online environment, we decided for use in Portmarnock Community School.

I will answer this question when redrafting. I have also used Fronter and examined StudyWiz and BlackBoard. Personally I philosophically like the idea of Open Source Software (such as Moodle) – its development links to my value of collaboration.

I will include a number of sentences on my rationale for using Moodle when I come to redrafting the article.

Shankar wrote 3.Page 6 Section 2.1 Last para - The term 'dialogue' has a specific meaning and process. Did you use the dialogue process online? I have been exposed to 'dialogue' sessions face-to-face and am curious to know whether you used a specific process in your forum discussions that rendered it to be a dialogue rather than a series of on-line conversations?

Donal’s response

There was a challenge in moving from â€a series of online conversations’ to â€dialogue’ – I understood dialogue in the context of cognitive presence as explained in 2.1.1, paragraph two.

Hatton and Smith (1995) offered a framework that allowed me to examine the online conversations or dialogue – and try to understand if dialogue was taking place – this evolved over the course of the research. Levels Three and Four of Hatton and Smiths framework (dialogic reflection and critical reflection) were reflected in some of the online forums. I will link some of these forums to the article in order to clarify what I say.


Shankar wrote Page 7 Section 2.1.1 This is more of a comment than a question. Recently there has been a great deal of interest in assessing student to prepare them for life mainly in higher education.

See 'Rethinking assessment in higher education: Learning for the longer term' edited by David Boud and Nancy Falchikov published by Routledge in 2007. Professor Ronald Barnett also talks about becoming a 'critical being' in his book. Do you think that we should be preparing students to be 'critical beings'? Should our assessments be focused on teaching life skills? You may like to explore this in your PhD.

Donal’s response Boud is certainly on the reading list! It is so important that we give students the opportunity and space to be critical. The Irish Leaving Certificate calls on students to be critical. It asks that students be able to look at controversial issues from more than one point of view and that students learn that their own judgements “be subjected to the most searching analysis and criticism”

...Thanks for those references.


Shankar wrote Page 8 Sec 2.2 Why does Lumby conclude that the need for working collaboratively is particularly relevant to the 21st century? Hasn't this movement been evolving fo some time?

Donal’s response absolutely agree with you – an unnecessary/irrelevant reference - will delete.

Shankar wrote Page 10 Sec 2.3 Para 1 'Society of equals' in what way? In knowledge or thinking? The term equals could have multiple meanings.

Donal’s response – Shankar’s your observation here is challenging - Perhaps what I might say is

“I began by examining what I believe is the purpose of education, namely, a democratic activity conducted by students and teachers who think critically together, for the purpose of creating a just society”.

This would reflect a piece I wrote in my Master’s dissertation

Chomsky (1994), in writing about John Dewey, says that for most of his (Dewey’s) life, he believed that educational reforms could bring about social change. Chomsky develops this theme using Thomas Jefferson’s idea of people choosing to become a society of democrats or aristocrats. The only option for humanity is the society of democrats, where people identify with each other as they look after the public interest together. The aristocrats however draw power into the hands of the few.


Shankar wrote Page 11 Sec 3.2 I think it may be useful to point out that there were three cycles in your action plan. Were they deliberately planned as three cycles or did they evolve as you started reflecting on your learning? If not at Sec 3.2 they could be mentioned at the start of section 4.2. on page 14.

Donal’s response – the cycles were not deliberately planned but they evolved over the period of the research. I will do as you recommend in relation to mentioning the three cycles in Section 4.2. My concern was to encourage online dialogue.


Shankar wrote Page 16 Section 4.2 Para 1 - Were the students allowed to post anonymously? Did this give them more freedom to express their opinions?

Donal’s response – No there was no anonymity – there were a lot of things happening in my history class in Portmarnock that could not be mentioned in a relatively short article or even in my dissertation. I don’t mean â€could not’ in the sense that they are excluded – I am talking word-count and keeping to the point.

Irish students at the time (2005-2007) were hugely engaged in Social Networking and a sub-text of what I did was to promote some understanding of an educational use of skills they had acquitted in Facebook, Bebo or wherever. As I think through your question I think they found greater freedom of expression through the online environment than in the traditional class. Some students who would reluctantly have spoken in class (if â€forced’) were happy to contribute online.

Shankar wrote Page 16 Section 4.2. Para 2 - What made you realise that you were becoming more responsive to to your own learning? Was this based on your reflections in your journal? Do you think it would be good to include a quote here from your journal?

Donal’s response

OK – Yes - I should have included – I will incorporate this quotation from my dissertation into the article and further link to online dialogues

As I started to post contributions to the discussion forums and then receive responses from fellow participants and former students in the MSc class, deep personal learning began to occur, as the power of the forums began to emerge. Not alone was I discussing, for example, an educational theory with fellow teachers but also with trainers from the public service, who deal with clients from a variety of social background, or with nurses bringing their particular healthcare perspective to the debate.

Shankar wrote Page 18 Section 4.3 Last but one para - Similar question to the last one? How did you conclude that some crtical thinking was taking place?

Donal’s response

Yes – I will include relevant evidence


Shankar wrote Page 19 Section 4.4 Last para - Evidence of student learning to support your claim.

Donal’s response

OK – I can link to a thread from one of the forums

Shankar wrote Page 20 Section 4.5 First para - What different ways did you use technology besides the discussion forums?

Donal’s response

I will list these: in the main it was through the online learning platform - through it we embedded videos, had the occasional online quiz, wrote a Wiki, searched with Google, created a website………………………

Shankar wrote Page 20- Section 4.6 You mention a few people besides your supervisor? Were these your co-researchers? Or were the students your co-researchers? This is not very clear. Perhaps this is my ignorance of the use of action research in education. My experience of AR is mainly in organizations where the people affected by the problem become co-researchers.

Donal’s response

I would understand these people more as part of a process of validation, reassurance and critique – critical-friends and/or members of validation groups - many of us were new to action research and to a self study of our practice.

I did not engage formally with the students as co-researchers but we did informally learn a huge amount from each other. I had an interesting email from Denise (the girl in the article photo) this very week – she wrote in relation to her using Moodle as a First Year University student

About knowing how to use moodle before hand- yeah it was real handy knowing how to use it for example one of the subjects I'm doing is geography and there is alot of online quizzes and without knowing it, i had found is so much easier then other students to manage. Being used to something important such as moodle in college that practically the whole year were new to gave me an advantage and made it easier to adapt to 3rd level. :)

Now for my big question:

Shankar wrote I go back to your research question where you ask how can you use technology (in the form of a collaborative learning environment) to improve your practice and encourage your pupils to think critically? My question is how did technology make a difference in helping students to think critically? Could what you achieved, through Moodle, not be achieved in a face-to face situation in a class room? What difference did technology make besides being a convenient and interesting tool to use? Would students be motivated to express their opinions more freely when they are not in the presence of a teacher?

Donal’s Response

Yes – In an online environment the students also have time to think, to lurk (read others responses), to edit. They also do this in their own time (usually late at night).

It also helped the students to re-engage with history as a subject and brought newness to the way they engage with a class subject. This was the first time anything like this was done in Portmarnock Community School.

The dialogue was very important – I will include link to some examples of these in the revised article to help the reader understand how technology made a difference in helping students to think critically.

Thanks Shankar

Kind regards

Donal




Donal O' Mahony
Re: Establishing relationship
by Donal O' Mahony - Friday, 9 January 2009, 7:24 PM
 
Dear all

Shankar (in email correspondence) asked me for my reflections on what I thought of the editorial process.

  • The first comment that I will make is that this is new to me. I have never undergone any type of peer-reviewing process before and the word I keep using in describing the process to interested colleagues is 'rigour'. That can only be a good thing.
  • Secondly is the question of time - my reflections/reactions took longer than I expected - Sometimes the online environment elicits an immediacy in response - I am glad I took the time.
  • I realise I still must rewrite parts of my article but the editorial process had encouraged my own confidence to do that
Kind Regards

Donal




Picture of Shankar Sankaran
Re: Establishing relationship
by Shankar Sankaran - Saturday, 10 January 2009, 1:26 AM
 

Dear Donal,

Thanks for the feedback on process. Certainly the open process is much more useful and valuable to both parties. Perhaps the only step I may want to suggest to Moira is that the editorial board has a quck look through the submissions before they decide that it is ready for review. This will avoid reviewers being annoyed that the submission is not in good shape. No reflection on your paper though! It was good.

I like Stephen Covey's suggestion about leaving a space between 'stimulus' and 'response'. It is often difficult in an online environment.

I am happy that the review process has made you more confident which is often not the case with 'blind reviews'. smile

Shankar

Picture of Shankar Sankaran
Re: Establishing relationship
by Shankar Sankaran - Saturday, 10 January 2009, 1:15 AM
 
Thanks Donal.

I am happy with your responses and the actions you have outlined. I hope the review has been useful for you. I am delighted to learn that students are still communicating with you about their experience. That must be very encouraging.

All the best and Look forward to read your final paper.

Warm regards

Shankar
Picture of Ram Singh-Punia
Re: Submission - How can I encourage my pupils to think critically through collaborative online learning?
by Ram Singh-Punia - Tuesday, 13 January 2009, 8:17 PM
 

I believe I should introduce my self to the writer before making my comments to appreciate his work. I have a technical background as a chartered builder turned an international educator in technical and vocational education in the FE/HE sectors. It means that I have technical background in my professional background. I came to action research via educational technology to improve teaching learning process in the seventies. The gap between prepositional theory and practice in real settings brought me into research on teachers thinking largely based on teacher reports. For me action research links propositional knowledge derived from disciplines with teachers’ practical knowledge. It improves practice and the practitioner as an integrated process. Action research has many forms and living educational theory form of action research is one of them. The focus of this research is on the professional development of the practitioner. I used this form of research in my EdD inquiry to understand the nature of my professional Self/(I) embedded in my CV.

The writer of this paper is using this kind of inquiry to answer the question in the title of his paper. I greatly enjoyed reading this paper as I had spent much time in seventies to study, practice and teach the use of multimedia to improve teaching and learning process in a college of education. My MA thesis (1978) presented a framework to integrate educational technology in curriculum development. I believe this framework is still valid for the development of education. However, in the past I was not conscious of the embodied values embedded in my professional work.

The use of ICT for the improvement of human life remains a burning unresolved issue. ICT is expensive and we have to learn to use it as a tool- not as a master. That necessitates ongoing vigilance on our human values. In this context living educational technology is an appropriate methodology to study its use in education at this time. This is what I appreciated most in this paper. At present my son is studying how ICT could be integrated into management to improve practices in the industrial and commercial fields. This paper may be useful to him.

In this paper the author presents the living educational theory of an individual attempting to introduce ICT in teaching his subject to promote critical thinking amongst his students and to live his educational values fully. I believe he has been successful in this endeavour. I am delighted to find the use of living educational theory form of action research in integrating ICT in teaching and learning. For me this study presents a committed teacher who owns learning from various sources and contextualises it in teaching his subject using critical thinking.

Good points

As mentioned above, it is a very valuable study making use of living educational theory in a particular context. A systematic approach is used to study and present the study clearly. The following suggestions are made to further clarify and extend this excellent paper.

A Few suggestions for improvement

1. You should present information about your self and your students before this inquiry began and at the end of this enquiry. It would clarify the change to the reader.

2. Figure one pops up without any explanation. What are you trying to communicate through it?

3. I had to read your paper several times to understand your standards of judgement and your claim to knowledge. I think it is there. It might be better to present them more clearly as this is what a living educational theory is all about. For instance, you claim to have a new theory of your practice. What is new about it? For me you have acted to solve a problem and produced personal professional knowledge. This is a powerful claim to knowledge. I wish all teachers could this.

4. I believe living educational theory form of action research is living, which means it is an ongoing process. So what do you intend to explore and or do in future? For instance, you might explore better ways to assess the extent of critical thinking your students developed in this study. You indicate that some effect did take place. What does it mean?

5. You have produced a very valuable piece of work. You should indicate the value of this work to you, other teachers and researchers clearly.

I hope these suggestions are of some use to you and you will extend your work further. It has much unexplored potential. Thank you for letting me review your paper. I learnt much from your paper.

With love and regards,

Ram Punia.

References

  1. Punia R S (1974), Educational Technology: Theory and practice at the Hong Kong Technical Teachers College. Diploma in Educational Technology Dissertation: Plymouth Polytechnic.

  1. Punia R S (1978), Educational Technology in Curriculum Development: A Conceptual Map. M A Education Dissertation, University of Lancaster.

  1. Punia R S (2004), My CV is MY Curriculum: Making of an international educator. EdD Thesis, University of Bath.

Donal O' Mahony
Re: Submission - How can I encourage my pupils to think critically through collaborative online learning?
by Donal O' Mahony - Saturday, 17 January 2009, 4:32 PM
 

Hi all and a big thank you to Ram and Shankar

I attach my article with some of the points raised by Ram and Shankar addressed. This was more of a challenge than I expected!

Regards

Donal

Picture of Moira Laidlaw
Re: Submission - How can I encourage my pupils to think critically through collaborative online learning?
by Moira Laidlaw - Sunday, 18 January 2009, 7:08 PM
 
Hi Donal. I wanted to thank you very much for revising your paper so promptly. I know how difficult it can be to change one's own ideas, but your openness to critique and your willingness to go through this process so openly and so professionally is a real inspiration to me. Thank you.

And of course, I thank you Shankar and Ram for your very constructive approaches to this open reviewing process.

You have all made our editorial job a lot easier. Cheers.

Warmest regards to you all,
Moira.



Donal O' Mahony
Re: Submission - How can I encourage my pupils to think critically through collaborative online learning?
by Donal O' Mahony - Sunday, 18 January 2009, 11:28 PM
 
Hi Moira, Ram and Shankar

I found the revision difficult, in that I am not sure if I was faithful to Shankar and Ram's original comments.

It was 'easier' to respond to Ram and Shankar's questions on an individual level - it was more challenging to incorporate the same responses back into the article.

I have linked some of the original discussion threads, to show how the students I taught, and I, interacted with each other - I am interested in hearing if these links give life/meaning to the article.

I hope I make sense!

Regards to all

Donal




Picture of Moira Laidlaw
Re: Submission - How can I encourage my pupils to think critically through collaborative online learning?
by Moira Laidlaw - Wednesday, 11 February 2009, 11:27 AM
 
Hi Donal. I have heard from Ram who has agreed to the publication of your paper. I am in contact with Shankar who has take your paper to read and check on a journey and he will be in contact within days. Just wanted you to know.

Love from, Moira x
Donal O' Mahony
Re: Submission - How can I encourage my pupils to think critically through collaborative online learning?
by Donal O' Mahony - Wednesday, 11 February 2009, 9:44 PM
 
Hi Moira

Thank you very much for keeping me up to date. Thank you Ram also.

Sincerely

Donal
Picture of Shankar Sankaran
Re: Submission - How can I encourage my pupils to think critically through collaborative online learning?
by Shankar Sankaran - Sunday, 15 February 2009, 12:09 AM
 
Dear Donal (cc Moira)

I have read your paper during my travels and am happy with it to be published as is. I think you have done a good job of responding to my comments. Good luck with your further endevaours as an action researcher and living theorist! I hope we will catch up in person sometime.

Warm regards

Shankar
Donal O' Mahony
Re: Submission - How can I encourage my pupils to think critically through collaborative online learning?
by Donal O' Mahony - Sunday, 15 February 2009, 12:28 AM
 
Hi Shankar, Ram and Moira

Shankar thank you very much. I found this process very interesting - looking at the various submissions, it is fascinating to see how everyone's story / research account is different - and how rigour is maintained through dialogue.

Thanks again - I do hope I meet you all sometime.

Regards

Donal




Donal O' Mahony
Re: Submission - How can I encourage my pupils to think critically through collaborative online learning?
by Donal O' Mahony - Monday, 16 March 2009, 10:44 PM
 
Dear Moira, Branko, Shankar and Ram

Thank you all very much for your support over the last number of months as I put together my article for EJOLTS.

It was a good experience to see and read the 'final product'.

I had never engaged in any type of reviewing process (open or closed) before - but I do think the dynamic offered by the EJOLTS open reviewing process, is educational in the true meaning of the word, in that it 'leads out' the story you have to tell.

I realise there is no 'final product' and I do hope I engage with you again as I pursue my studies.

Moira, I thought the foreword was very well crafted. Thank you.

Like Moira, I would like to thank Margaret Farren for her support with this issue of EJOLTS.

Kind regards and happy St. Patrick's Day!

Donal

http://www.southwestwalksireland.com/images/stories/western/traditional/cliffs-of-moher-ireland.jpg
moz-screenshot-1.jpgmoz-screenshot-2.jpgmoz-screenshot-3.jpg
Picture of Moira Laidlaw
Re: Submission - How can I encourage my pupils to think critically through collaborative online learning?
by Moira Laidlaw - Tuesday, 17 March 2009, 8:14 AM
 
Many thanks, Donal, for your kind words. I am delighted that you found the process educational: I certainly did as well. As for the foreword, it wrote itself somehow. What pleases me the most is the sense of building something together, a space in which people can speak for themselves on issues that concern them - Foucault's words are resonant for me in what I believe we're all wanting to do with EJOLTS. The open review process does seem to have offered people an opportunity to develop their papers without coercion, a space in which authors and reviewers can come to know their own minds anew and wokr with others to craft a more comprehensible paper.

So, my thanks to you as well, Shankar and Ram, for your considerations of Dona's paper, which helped to improve the quality of the work. Through your own insights and preparedness to work with Donal, the quality of his paper was enhanced, and his voice, in my opinion, became stronger. And that's another point. We are hoping that the open reviewing process strengthens an author's voice, not weakens it.

And I agree, there is no product in this kind of work, only moments when we capture something, and then move on to the next insights and experiences.

And that picture, Donal, is glorious. Just glorious! And Happy St. Patrick's Day to you too!

Love from, Moira x
Branko Bognar
Re: Submission - How can I encourage my pupils to think critically through collaborative online learning?
by Branko Bognar - Saturday, 21 March 2009, 5:56 PM
 
Dear Donal, I am happy you consider that the open review process was an educational experience for you since it was our intention when we decided to include them in the EJOLTS publishing procedure. I hope that this educational experience will help us all to continue with our cooperation and publishing new educational stories in EJOLTS or in some other educational journal/publication. smile