Published papers

A living-theory pedagogy for postgraduate distance learning education

 
petemellett
A living-theory pedagogy for postgraduate distance learning education
by Peter Mellett - Monday, 10 October 2016, 6:40 PM
 

The attached .zip file contains ten documents - the main paper is a .docx file which is accompanied by nine supporting .pdf files.

Please note that the main text contains links indicated by blue underlined type. The intention is for the published paper to link out from the EJOLTS html online version to the supporting documents that will also open within the reader's web browser. These documents are not intended for close reading but to give readers a sense of where I am coming from or to supply extra supporting information if required.

Please also note that the referencing is as accurate and full as I am able to make it, given my current lack of access to sources that I initially encountered years ago. In several instances, I have not been able to supply the page number.

Looking forward to a useful and interesting conversation that will help us to strengthen this draft.

- Pete

Picture of Stephen Bigger
Re: A living-theory pedagogy for postgraduate distance learning education
by Stephen Bigger - Tuesday, 11 October 2016, 6:59 PM
 

From Stephen Bigger,

Hi Pete,

I note you have tried to keep EJOLTS criteria at the front of your mind, for which well done. However my overall first impression is that this piece is overly descriptive, with a mass of contextual material I got rather lost in. The trouble is that reflecting on life needs to be rigorous and have hard edges.  I tend to look hard for criticality, especially in the conceptualisation of the phenomenon discussed (i.e. evidence of theoretical underpinning).  It  leaves me with a number of questions which may be the place for you to start revising. We can deal with typos and presentation issues later but your first task is shaping your critical argument.

1.       What is gained and lost by opting for distance over face to face learning? You could talk about the place of group discussion in learning, and discuss whether Moodle can ever be a replacement. Clearly distance has a logistical advantage, so enhancing student interaction with tutors and fellow students is key.

2.       Living theory starts with the notion that practitioners want to improve. This means that a) there was dissatisfaction with  what was done before (please itemise and explain), b) a journey into deeper understanding of the issues (please discuss), c) a plan to bring about change (please discuss your choices and reasons for them), and d) finally an evaluative process to check that the changes are fit for purpose. It may be that aspects of these are buried under the description but they need to be central and signposted.

3.       Certainly  academia stands on the shoulders of giants, and debts have to be acknowledged, but the overall feel of the references is that they are antique. Innovative theoretical work over the last two decades should be strongly represented, and your conclusions should move theorising forwards. Future scholars should be referring to your work in their own journeys, and in reading this I am not convinced that they will. Try to put your finger on what you could conclude which will help the journeys of others.

4.       I ran a distance learning M.A. unit in the 1990s. We had limited face-to-face in an opening and mid-point weekend conference.  That set the tone and expectation and it is hard to see how things would have worked without it. Students needed content which might be provided by reading lists and specially commissioned materials. It also needed thought provoking stuff which ideally is part of the assessment process. I arranged assessment to be experiential - not only reflecting on performance but introducing new experiences which challenged thinking.  There might be elements here which will help your signposting.

5.       This leads to thoughts on reflective practice. Given that Schön was a pioneer, who has extended the concept and how? In particular, how can reflection be critical and think outside the box?

a)       I see the Frankfurt School lurking, but the critical studies agenda could be more central. This defines improvement in terms of equity, social justice, democracy in the face of authoritarianism, prejudice, discrimination and repression. (The roots of the Frankfurt School were anti-Nazi. They will certainly be anti-Trump also). This would seem to be one approach to criticality.

b)      Recent literature on phronesis is centrally focused on work-related skills. It would make a strong addition to your discussion and theorisation.

c)       Similarly there is a literature on dialogue - enhancing the sense of internal dialogue in the course would strengthen it. How to stimulate dialogue is a vital teaching aid, even more important in distance learning. This is rooted in the work of Mikhail Bakhtin.

d)      Activity theory, stemming from Vygotsky's sociocultural work can also provide a framework for interrogating reflection on experience.

6.       I have tried to be provocative about criticality and theory. I think you need to reduce the vast descriptive passages and make them subservient to a critical theoretical  argument which is introduced at the beginning, signposted throughout, and summed up as a model that future scholars can use. I see this as your next task. 

Good luck.  Stephen


petemellett
Re: A living-theory pedagogy for postgraduate distance learning education
by Peter Mellett - Wednesday, 2 November 2016, 3:30 PM
 

Stephen -

I have now posted version 3 earlier today.  I hope you think it takes into account your comments about removing details of the ICM programme itself to the sidelines as links. Version 3 is much changed from version 1.  I have not been able to envisage how I might have presented the paper as a critical theoretical argument, without losing the voice with which I have been speaking for many years - it would be a contrivance for me to attempt it.

I hope you can find the time to peruse and let me know your thoughts.

- Peter

Picture of Jacqueline Delong
Re: A living-theory pedagogy for postgraduate distance learning education
by Jacqueline Delong - Thursday, 13 October 2016, 5:09 PM
 

Hi, Pete. I enjoyed reading about the transformation in the ICTP program. You are to be commended for making it a much more relevant course. This paper needs to hear from Pete and his students. The one at the end is a good start. We need more, more of their experiences and more of yours. In particular, we need to hear how this new programme has reinforced or challenged your values. It reads like a 'smooth story of self' when we know that life is seldom like that.

I have attached a document of some suggestions. I hope that you will consider them in the spirit that they are shared-loving kindness. Please let me know if I can help in any way.


Love, Jackie

Picture of Jacqueline Delong
Re: A living-theory pedagogy for postgraduate distance learning education
by Jacqueline Delong - Thursday, 13 October 2016, 5:09 PM
 

Hi, Pete. I enjoyed reading about the transformation in the ICTP program. You are to be commended for making it a much more relevant course. This paper needs to hear from Pete and his students. The one at the end is a good start. We need more, more of their experiences and more of yours. In particular, we need to hear how this new programme has reinforced or challenged your values. It reads like a 'smooth story of self' when we know that life is seldom like that.

I have attached a document of some suggestions. I hope that you will consider them in the spirit that they are shared-loving kindness. Please let me know if I can help in any way.


Love, Jackie

Picture of Jacqueline Delong
Re: A living-theory pedagogy for postgraduate distance learning education
by Jacqueline Delong - Monday, 17 October 2016, 6:28 PM
 

Hi, Pete. Me, again! I just wanted to say that in the spirit of community and continuing dialogue that I would like to offer to continue the dialogue about your article and not just let the response to it be the end. In our community we value the relationship and value encouragement and support. Please know that I desire very much to offer what support I have to offer and hope that you will contact me if in fact I can be of assistance.


Love, Jackie



petemellett
Re: A living-theory pedagogy for postgraduate distance learning education
by Peter Mellett - Tuesday, 18 October 2016, 1:13 PM
 

 . . . other priorities at present - daughter visiting with 18 month old toddler plus dog while husband relocates - daughter-in-law visiting from Brazil so doing Blueprint work http://www.blueprintnetwork.org/ - they all go home tomorrow so I shall then have space to get my head back into this paper and the responses that have been made so far - where's the third reviewer? - Pete

petemellett
Re: A living-theory pedagogy for postgraduate distance learning education
by Peter Mellett - Wednesday, 19 October 2016, 1:07 PM
 

Many thanks for your comments so far and apologies for the delay in posting this response.

To begin, please bear in mind that I have been and continue to be anchored by two sets of EJOLTS guidelines, which I hold as fundamental to the tasks of both writing and reviewing:

1.  The EJOLTS homepage at ejolts.net includes a statement about Commitment and Scope, which states, inter alia:
"Researchers generate their living-theories as their values-based explanations for their educational influences in their own learning, the learning of others and the learning of social formations. … The values at the heart of Living Educational Theory research … are the life-enhancing values that are relational and ontological, in the sense that they give meaning and purpose to the lives of individuals and groups."

2. The  EJOLTS Review Process guidelines at http://ejolts.net/review - I maintain that a balance must be struck between items 1,2,6, & 7 taken together and item 9, in as much as I can use insights from the literature to illuminate my account, but that account should not be dominated by an analysis of those sources.

I hear you suggesting that I reduce the contextual material, increase the voices of myself and my students, use up-to-date references to more strongly represent innovative theoretical work over the past two decades, shape the critical argument by making the critical studies agenda more central, and add elements of phronesis to improve discussion and theorisation plus contributions from the work of Bakhtin and Vigotsky.

My task is now to reconcile 1. and 2. above with these points that you have raised and to take action.

I agree that the current draft (I have a self-imposed limit of 6,500 words for the main text) reads as a "smooth story of self" (Jacqui) and I also understand that Item 9. in the  EJOLTS Review Process guidelines needs attention. However, I am unsure how to amend the text so that it reads as a "critical theoretical argument which is introduced at the beginning, signposted throughout, and summed up as a model that future scholars can use" (Richard).

So - at a practical level, where shall I start? Please give me some pointers by suggesting specific passages on which I might best focus my effort, so that the paper comes better to represent a values-based explanation of my educational influences (as Item 1. above).
 
- Pete

petemellett
Re: A living-theory pedagogy for postgraduate distance learning education
by Peter Mellett - Wednesday, 19 October 2016, 3:09 PM
 

Apologies -

For Richard read Stephen

- Pete

Picture of Jacqueline Delong
Re: A living-theory pedagogy for postgraduate distance learning education
by Jacqueline Delong - Wednesday, 19 October 2016, 4:18 PM
 

Hi, Peter. I hope that you had a good visit with your daughter and grandchild!

Let's keep working on this article. I hope that you will incorporate some of your background and learnings from the Road to Damascus which helps the reader understand some of you background. In addition, it would be very helpful if you share your learning  and your student's learning from the implementation of this programme. The voices of others such as students would validate the claims to have improved this program.

If you could share more directly what values you hold and how you have lived according to them or have not, we might get a clearer view of the nature of your influence on yourself, others and on social formations that constitute a living-theory paper. 

I/we need to hear some of that passion you have for improving yourself and the world around you.

I hope that I have been helpful. Let me know if I have not and I will try again.


Love, Jackie

Picture of Jacqueline Delong
Re: A living-theory pedagogy for postgraduate distance learning education
by Jacqueline Delong - Wednesday, 19 October 2016, 4:19 PM
 

Hi, Peter. I hope that you had a good visit with your daughter and grandchild!

Let's keep working on this article. I hope that you will incorporate some of your background and learnings from the Road to Damascus which helps the reader understand some of you background. In addition, it would be very helpful if you share your learning  and your student's learning from the implementation of this programme. The voices of others such as students would validate the claims to have improved this program.

If you could share more directly what values you hold and how you have lived according to them or have not, we might get a clearer view of the nature of your influence on yourself, others and on social formations that constitute a living-theory paper. 

I/we need to hear some of that passion you have for improving yourself and the world around you.

I hope that I have been helpful. Let me know if I have not and I will try again.


Love, Jackie

petemellett
Re: A living-theory pedagogy for postgraduate distance learning education
by Peter Mellett - Thursday, 20 October 2016, 12:09 PM
 

Jackie -

Ideally, you and I would be together in the same room with the draft printed out, the pages taped together and the whole thing pinned to the wall in front of us - the whole text, content and structure,  available at a glance, rather than arranged on a PC screen in the form of a Babylonian scroll viewed through a letter box. The ancillary files would be available on a nearby screen. As in your latest post to this forum, you would say:

" I hope that you will incorporate some of your background and learnings from the Road to Damascus which helps the reader understand some of you background"

... and you would then indicate a suitable place within the draft for the inclusion of this new material, and we would discuss an outline of scope and extent. This insertion could well require the deletion of existing text in that area or the reassignment of text to elsewhere. We would indicate our thoughts by applying felt pens to the hard copy. 

In this manner, I would be able to share your vision for a strengthened structure, content and emphasis. However, we are confined to exchanges via the medium of this forum. There is no (dialectical) conversation, but a (positivist) back and forth as in a tennis match.

Turning to your comment: '… it would be very helpful if you share your learning  and your students' learning from the implementation of this programme. The voices of others such as students would validate the claims to have improved this program."

The Moodle pages that contain the original student discussion forums have largely expired and so students' voices from all but the recent stage are no longer available. Improvement in terms of take-up and completion are clear from the University statistics that are included in the original 'ITM' engineering paper. Improvement in terms of student experience are contained in the 12 completed questionnaires (Lickert and free response) designed for the 'ITM' engineering paper. Would this material be suitable? Student portfolio work is similar to or of lesser quality to the Pearce Sanders material already included .

Your next comment: "If you could share more directly what values you hold and how you have lived according to them or have not, we might get a clearer view of the nature of your influence on yourself, others and on social formations that constitute a living-theory paper."

Those values are currently not expressed overtly but I would suggest that they are implicit in much of what I have written. I shall compose a summary that starts with their origins in my forebears in Shoreditch, my father's experiences in the army and how they have influenced my own choices and efforts. 

Finally: "I/we need to hear some of that passion you have for improving yourself and the world around you."

I do not have passions (see definition for its multiple meanings) - I may have strong enthusiasms that I feel and act on with varying intensities as time passes. I want readers to get a sense of who I am - as a historical being - and for me, that sense comes through the general aesthetic of a piece of writing and the ability of the reader to engage and grasp 'what is written between the lines'. As I said to someone a while ago: "You do not know what despair is, do you?" … "I do, because I have experienced it. The word alone thus carries no meaning between us - but I can show you some photographs and tell you about them so that you might gain some insight."

OK - so the draft is pinned to the wall in front of us - how will our conversation go? (Do we need to Skype?)

Love Pete


Picture of Jacqueline Delong
Re: A living-theory pedagogy for postgraduate distance learning education
by Jacqueline Delong - Thursday, 20 October 2016, 6:49 PM
 

Hi, Pete.  I do recognize and appreciate how you are feeling, as much a  I can given our different experiences. I would love to SKYPE about these issues. I am going on a trip to northern Spain tomorrow for a week but could Skype most days  except tomorrow which is a long day in the car, if I have internet, which I do not know right now. Please give me some times that would work for you and we could go from there.


Love, Jackie

petemellett
Re: A living-theory pedagogy for postgraduate distance learning education
by Peter Mellett - Thursday, 20 October 2016, 8:10 PM
 

Jackie -

I am free most of next week except Tuesday and Thursday evenings. Spain is one hour ahead of here which is GMT+1 at the moment. Best if you suggest some dates / times and I shall work around those. The points raised above will do as a starting point for us to work towards an improved structure, content and emphasis. I always find that once something is sketched out in my head and on the back of the proverbial 'fag packet', then the job's as good as done.

Talk later -

Love Pete

Picture of Jacqueline Delong
Re: A living-theory pedagogy for postgraduate distance learning education
by Jacqueline Delong - Friday, 21 October 2016, 8:20 PM
 

Hi, Pete. I have been thinking about how to help with this process. I was reading one of the attachments, the one about your family and thought that this:

Turning now to values and the role they play in our lives, I return to the obvious fact that, as Peter Mellett, I am son to my father Ernest and my mother Mary – and, in turn, father to my son Paul and my daughter Mary who were born to Jane; Paul married Ruth; Mary married Matt and they have a son, Rowan. On the male side of the family, I bridge the generations between my father and my son; I am the conduit through which my parents' fundamental values relating to freedom, justice and democracy have flowed through the generations – values that have successively adapted to inform each generation and the spirit of the age in which they have found themselves. On the female side of the family, there are equally strong and parallel values that have flowed through my mother, Mary, Paul's mother Jane and from her mother Ann. Those values will flow onwards through Mary to Rowan – and also through the Blueprint Project founded on Paul's death by his colleagues as his living legacy.

 

at the very least, needs to be near the beginning with some kind of subtitle about biography or where do my values come from.

I am coming to the realization that the personal, values-based ideas are found in the attachments and need to be in the text.

We are on the road so I know that this is short notice. Is tomorrow morning a possibility? I could be on Skype at 9:15 tomorrow which is 8:15 UK time. Let me know if this works and if not we will try again.


Love, Jackie

 


petemellett
Re: A living-theory pedagogy for postgraduate distance learning education
by Peter Mellett - Sunday, 23 October 2016, 11:29 AM
 

Jackie -

Your latest posting here really got me going. I have followed your suggestion to bring details of my values and their basis into the main text. I have also followed an earlier suggestion to add some of the 'Road to Damascus' material. I think that the two sit well together and links could be made between the two at later stage. Thus, material up to page 10 has been largely amended; after page 10 is as before.

Would you please read the new material pp.1-10 and peruse the rest so that you can offer me some suggestions about reducing the description of the CMDL - ICM programme history, while not losing the sense of context. What would be sufficient? I have perhaps been too long on the inside of this Construction Management programme to be able to see the answer to that one.

I hope that your travels in Spain are going well. I had suggested Skype as a means to 'get me going' in the right direction. However, I am now on a roll so the printed text will do fine for the time being. I shall copy this post to your email address too with an identical Word file to accompany the pdf.

Looking forward to reading your comments. I hope this is not too much of an intrusion on your holiday.

- Love Pete

Picture of Jacqueline Delong
Re: A living-theory pedagogy for postgraduate distance learning education
by Jacqueline Delong - Monday, 24 October 2016, 6:09 PM
 

Hi, Pete. You have done a great job of bringing in the details of your values and their basis into the main text, including some of the 'Road to Damascus' material. The two sit very well together. I have read the new material pp.1-10 and find it very enjoyable and educative. I have attached a few notes on improving some references.


I would suggest making page 10-22 an attachment with the specifics of the program and write briefly about the changes that were made to make the learning experience for the students more meaningful within the main text. I think this can be done by reducing the description of the CMDL - ICM programme history while not losing the sense of context. 

The specific stories like the one on p, 15-16 and 23 could be retained to support the claim to have improved the course. Don't you have others? Do you some reflections on your learning as you taught the course

I think that the abstract now needs a rewrite and the last paragraph or two might share your learning in this process of creating and teaching the new programme and in the process of writing this article.

Let me know if I can be of further help. I just had a beautiful day in Santiago de Compostela chatting with pilgrims at the end of the Camino.

Love, Jackie


Picture of Jerry Allender
Re: A living-theory pedagogy for postgraduate distance learning education
by Jerry Allender - Tuesday, 25 October 2016, 9:35 AM
 

Hi Pete


Attached are my comments on your paper. It is a valuable article. My feedback includes what I found to be most helpful as well as two suggestions for additions to the paper.

Jerry

petemellett
Re: A living-theory pedagogy for postgraduate distance learning education
by Peter Mellett - Thursday, 27 October 2016, 3:10 PM
 

I have not been idle over the past few days of silence but have been acting on several of the points raised by you so far. There have been added inputs: Stephen and Jerry may not know (Jackie does) that I am in regular contact with Jack and Marie at weekly meetings here at my house for coffee and a chat, often with Moira joining us via Skype.  In this manner, there are now five people (Jack is currently off-planet with the Rolling Stones) giving me a useful view of this paper from their various 'external' perspectives as I toil away within it (often not seeing the wood for the trees).

The attached Version 2 represents the current state of progress, as of two days ago. Compared to the first draft reviewed here, it contains two extra sections: one in which I explore the 'archeology' of my values and another in which I describe my educational development over 20 years. These two sections constitute roughly how I have discovered myself and how I have invented myself (the terms are used very loosely).

I now have to move on to Version 3. The task here will be to (i) incorporate responses made by Marie and Moira during this morning's Skype session to Version 2 (ii) to revisit comments made here in this forum and (iii) to transfer much of the description of the construction management programme from the main text to subsidiary links. The main aim will be to respond to the suggestions (challenge) made by Moira in a recent email, in which she offered:

"... I wonder whether you might write a synopsis of the course-related material with urls to the whole course. Then interspersed with it you might write examples about learners/learning about the kinds of human values you have traced through your ancestry and your own life. So the course becomes very much a reflection of the values that your paper is ultimately about, because it is so clearly a living-theory account of your own learning. It seems to me a paper where you can say, 'I know who I am,' 'I know where I stand,' and 'I know what I stand for.' For now at any rate. Your best self to date!"

Quite a challenge but that's what I shall aim at for Version 3, which I hope to post here by early next week.

Thanks for your work so far

Love to All - Pete




Picture of Jacqueline Delong
Re: A living-theory pedagogy for postgraduate distance learning education
by Jacqueline Delong - Wednesday, 2 November 2016, 9:34 AM
 

Hi, Pete. Your latest version is a pleasure to read. There is much more of you and your values explicit in the article. You challenge my thinking and that is good.

I still feel that some of the pages to do with the course could be attachments. I have attached some comments about missing references and pages for references and a few other odd and sods.

A last comment from you about the process of writing the paper might be considered.

Please let me know if I can be of further assistance.


Love, Jackie

petemellett
Re: A living-theory pedagogy for postgraduate distance learning education
by Peter Mellett - Wednesday, 2 November 2016, 1:52 PM
 

Dear Jackie

It seems that we have both been beavering away on this draft at the same time and have things to post here at the same time. I think that the version 3 attached here addresses the points you have raised. I am meeting with Jack and Marie tomorrow morning - are you available to join in via  Skype at 10:00 a.m. UK time?

You will see that I have concentrated on producing a text that I hope will be publishable in the light of all the comments received so far against the two previous drafts. Things have moved a great deal since version 1. Typos and sorting the references are for later, as is arranging for the links to activate a new HTML browser window rather than download a pdf.

Hope you can join us tomorrow

Love Pete

Picture of Jerry Allender
Re: A living-theory pedagogy for postgraduate distance learning education
by Jerry Allender - Thursday, 3 November 2016, 7:00 AM
 

Pete’s paper looks good to go

Jerry

petemellett
Re: A living-theory pedagogy for postgraduate distance learning education
by Peter Mellett - Friday, 4 November 2016, 9:25 PM
 

I have attached a zip file containing version 4 of the paper, which represents the text I am offering for the possibility of publishing in EJOLTs. As stated above, the intention is for the links highlighted in blue to be available as live downloads of each of the eight ancillary files.

Many thanks to all for your help.

- Pete

Picture of Jacqueline Delong
Re: A living-theory pedagogy for postgraduate distance learning education
by Jacqueline Delong - Saturday, 5 November 2016, 10:54 AM
 

Hi, Pete. This is really an excellent article: clear, consistent, scholarly, engaging and 'readerly'. I have enjoyed working with you on this process and learning more about myself, more about Living Theory and your living-theory. 

I have attached some notes about little things. I say with pleasure that I feel that this article is ready for publication.


Love, Jackie

petemellett
Re: A living-theory pedagogy for postgraduate distance learning education
by Peter Mellett - Wednesday, 2 November 2016, 3:23 PM
 

Jerry -

Version 3 posted earlier this afternoon. Do you have time to read and let me know your thoughts?

- Pete

Picture of Stephen Bigger
Re: A living-theory pedagogy for postgraduate distance learning education
by Stephen Bigger - Saturday, 5 November 2016, 1:45 PM
 

Hello Pete,

This article now has a tighter argument and seems to me to meet the journal publication criteria, after some tweaks of detail which are listed on the attached annotated copy. Well done. It reads clearly and well. The bibliographical references need sorting out and are a bit thin, so this may be something to focus on for your next paper.  There is a substantial literature on autobiography, and on Aristotle's phronesis which is relevant for your enterprise.  Stephen

petemellett
Re: A living-theory pedagogy for postgraduate distance learning education
by Peter Mellett - Sunday, 6 November 2016, 3:35 PM
 

Stephen -

Many thanks for your observations and for the work you have put into this review. While you have responded to version 3, the comments are fully applicable to version 4 posted above. I have attempted to respond to each comment without increasing the already extensive word count too much. I have not gone into the business of phronesis - to do justice to the subject would take time that I do not now have available and add at least another 500 words. It is an area that could suck me into a whole new paper. Also, I am currently rereading Pirsig's 'Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance'; pp. 352-376 confirm my existing lack of enthusiasm for things Aristotelian. While a 'popular' book, I think his arguments about rhetoric, dialectic and mythos/logos are persuasive. I hope you think I have responded adequately to your other comments, without resorting to tokenistic 'sandbagging'. I have added a footnote on page 21 acknowledging and explaining the lack of page numbers in some of the references.

------------------

Jackie-

I have also attempted to respond to your specific comments. Many thanks for sustaining the  conversation and for getting me unstuck and on with the process of revision. I needed that practical 'do this and try doing that' input to give the initial push.

------------------

Version 5 is attached. The links to websites are live; the links to the eight subsidiary documents are not - links to documents reference their location within this laptop and do not survive relocation to another IT environment. I am assuming that Branko will sort this out at a later stage within the EJOLTs environment.

- Pete


Picture of Jacqueline Delong
Re: A living-theory pedagogy for postgraduate distance learning education
by Jacqueline Delong - Tuesday, 8 November 2016, 12:40 PM
 

Hi, Pete. My pleasure. I'm sure Branko will sort the technical problems out.


Love, Jackie

Picture of Stephen Bigger
Re: A living-theory pedagogy for postgraduate distance learning education
by Stephen Bigger - Wednesday, 9 November 2016, 4:13 PM
 

I did say for your next paper. My line of thinking was prompted by the general need to demonstrate rigour in LT research.  S

petemellett
Re: A living-theory pedagogy for postgraduate distance learning education
by Peter Mellett - Wednesday, 9 November 2016, 7:43 PM
 

Yes - for next time - I shall now have a bit of a rest - many thanks - Pete