Published papers

A dream for equal education

 
Swaroop Rawal
A dream for equal education
by Swaroop Rawal - Friday, 1 April 2016, 9:05 PM
 

Rushita and I are looking forward to working with my reviewers. (The pictures move but Marie has said that is because of the various versions of WORD and will be sorted at the final format check stage.)

Picture of Pip Bruce Ferguson
Re: A dream for equal education
by Pip Bruce Ferguson - Friday, 1 April 2016, 9:46 PM
 

Swaroop and Rushita, I loved this paper. It tells a powerful story that is clearly, to my way of thinking, indicative of living educational theory work for both of you (especially Rushita).

I would have liked an early indication that your respective values are being uncovered later as the story unfolds. I found myself searching for articulated rather than hidden values early in the work. This is very easily covered by the insertion of a sentence or two towards the start.

Swaroop, you may also have indicated who wrote the Life Skills programme early in the paper but because I did SOME feedback yesterday and the rest today, I can't remember, and later on I wanted to know this. If you haven't put it in at the start, perhaps explain the genesis of the programme when you start talking about it.

It's going to be a great paper! I will look forward to the next (and hopefully final) iteration.

Swaroop Rawal
Re: A dream for equal education
by Swaroop Rawal - Wednesday, 6 April 2016, 5:53 PM
 

Dear Pip,

Thanks a lot the Typo and grammatical corrections carried out by you were really helpful.

The following are the answers to the questions raised by you. The rest I have corrected in the text like adding the page nos. And so on. I have also attached the corrected paper.

Pg 5 : Are you saying here you wanted to but were prevented, or you thought it was inappropriate? It feels like the former but I am not sure.

Pip , it was not whether I was allowed to or not nor was it inappropriate. But I just couldn’t support them for reasons like:

·         The physical distance between us ( pg 4)

·         The lack of internet facilities made even emails difficult.  Once just to send me some notes Rushita had to travel 16 Km (she has no car or any authorized vehicle to travel) to get to a cyber cafe. Read what Rushita had written...we had to edit it as the paper was becoming too long.

Rushita:

.....It was a testing time when I began this paper. Most of the times I hardly have any time as my duties at the KGBV take up all my time. If and when I find some time to write and refer to the relevant links given by Swaroop ma'am, I lose the internet connection as this village is remotely located. I hardly had a luxury of having a working internet connection all the time here in the school and hence, I had to consider an option of finding a cyber café which is 16 km away, visiting it frequently was again not possible. This makes my ‘writing time’ irregular . Once due to heavy rains and flooding my work was badly affected as my computer crashed and had to be reformatted; I landed up losing all my work..... I was very scared and disheartened. I had no clue as to what explanation to give Swaroop ma’am.....

·         Their lack of exposure to good literature is next to none

·         Lack of time. In India a government school teacher has to carry out many more tasks besides school and teaching duties.

All this makes it extremely difficult for them to write. And I could not do anything about all this ...I just could not help them....

 

Pg 5. You are going to need to explain, further on, the ethics of doing this and how you ensured that you weren’t misrepresenting what Rushita said. This is not a criticism, merely a reminder.

Please see the changes made in the text...

 I asked Rushita to write her thought spontaneously in text without worrying how well expressed or how theoretical it was. I later reflected and theorised her story. Rushita and I held a conversation all through the writing of this paper; a process of writing, reading, reflecting, speaking, listening and reflecting again, to ensure that I was interpreting her story accurately. 

 

Pg 9 You don’t need page number here unless you are directly quoting the work.

 Yes, I do realise this but I merely put the p. no. as it is there specifically on this page. Of course I can remove it ...or write ( see Rawal 2006, p. 2)

 

Pg 11 Rushita’s cynicism concerning whose? values was a road block for her.

Pip I want to say that Rushita was cynical about the concept of ‘values’ and ‘high moral grounds’. What I  mean is that when you are poor, marginalised and have a whole lot of values to stick to is difficult. Abject poverty does not leave space for values.

Rushita’s upbringing and societal norms created within her a habit of docility and submission, made her live in self doubt (Freire 1970), and experience what (Dewey, 1934, p. 272) termed as the ‘inertia of habit’. Rushita’s cynicism concerning values and ideals was a road block for her. The lack of dialogue and being treated as a ‘human resources’ was demotivating.

P 14 Did you develop this programme? If so, solely, or in conjunction with others? Would be interesting for the reader to know. Having said that, I’ve split feedback across two days so you may have said earlier.

On Pg 9 : LSTD is a programme developed by me and was created from my doctoral work.

P. 22 The ‘teaching’ machine, with the gift of imagination, was transforming who? into a caring, empathetic person.

The ‘teaching’ machine, with the gift of imagination, was transforming herself into a caring, empathetic person.

Thanks for your help.

Love,

Swaroop


Picture of Jacqueline Delong
Re: A dream for equal education
by Jacqueline Delong - Sunday, 3 April 2016, 7:15 PM
 

Hi, Rushita and Swaroop. 

This paper is inspirational and transformative. Well done. 


Contrary to the statement early in the paper, "By not doing so I hold myself guilty of not enabling my student-teachers’ ‘real’ life problems and struggle come to the forefront", I think that you, Swaroop, have accomplished just that, and Rushita, you have very clearly narrated your problems and struggles as well as those of your students. I think this point needs to be made near the end of the paper. The paper is a study in what can be accomplished despite overwhelming obstacles. A victory dance is in order.

I think the guilt comes from feeling that not enough teachers and students have experienced this transformation. Let's begin to give credit for helping one teacher, one student and continue on the path to include others.

My only concern lies in some sentence and grammatical errors that will need correction. The content is exemplary.


Love, Jackie

Robyn Pound
Re: A dream for equal education
by Robyn Pound - Monday, 4 April 2016, 12:55 PM
 

Swaroop,  I found this paper very moving. It stands perfectly well as it is with repair of a few typos which I have commented on in the attached paper.  However living theory researchers always want more and to comment! I have a couple of thoughts.  One is that the outcomes of the paper are much bigger than your initial expressed intention to get teachers to write and recognise themselves as knowledge creators.  They do this of course, but it seems to me that the increased democracy and enhanced self-worth of all participants, teachers and pupils, as a step towards social change is of huge importance too.  I notice this particularly because of an experience of my own here in the UK 10+ yrs ago. I was visiting a large extended Indian family in my role as a health visitor visiting families with small children.  I found cold disregard and lack of empathy from the family matriach (the only English speaker amongst the women) for her 2 daughters-in-law, when they had their babies.  However, this woman sought empathy and care for herself.   I realised there were deep influences creating the clear hierachy I saw. Your paper gives me a some insight into the possible social background for this.  I don't remember where they were from.  The young women remained socially isolated and uncomplaining and it felt as if there was not likely to be any shift for the children until they got to school when it could be destabilising for the family.  I didn't make any inroads into developing self esteem of these women such as you show through your paper, except perhaps for the matriach. You have reminded me of a situation which was not my finest hour and I wonder again how I could have done more for them all and the futures of their children.  Thank you Swaroop for this paper.   Robyn

Swaroop Rawal
Re: A dream for equal education
by Swaroop Rawal - Tuesday, 5 April 2016, 5:08 AM
 

Thank you Robyn,

This is just a quick acknowledgement. I will reply in details tomorrow.....actually I so want to leave everything and write back....but....

love,

Swaroop 

Swaroop Rawal
Re: A dream for equal education
by Swaroop Rawal - Wednesday, 6 April 2016, 5:59 PM
 

Dear Robyn,

Thank you for your comments and suggested corrections in text. I have carried out all of them, and I am posting the corrected papers as an attachment.

With reference to your comment on p 8

Thanking you for pointing it out. I believe I have shifted from Gender Index to HDI (Human Development Index. 

World Economic Forum’s Global Gender Gap Index- 2009: India ranked at 114 in the list of 155 countries of the world (UNDP, 2009). This index scans the gender gap in four major areas: health and life expectancy, economic participation and opportunity, educational achievements and political empowerment.

Sadly, there is no great progress made since Rushita started working in 2009. In 2015 India ranks 130 out of 188 countries in the United National Development Programme (UDPP, 2015). With an HDI (Human Development Index) value of 0.609, the report highlights glaring gender inequality in India. 

 

Please note I have corrected it to..... 

World Economic Forum’s Global Gender Gap Index- 2009: India ranked at 114 in the list of 155 countries of the world (UNDP, 2009). This index scans the gender gap in four major areas: health and life expectancy, economic participation and opportunity, educational achievements and political empowerment.

Sadly, there is no great progress made since Rushita started working in 2009. In 2015, India continues to have large education as well as economic gender gaps. The Global Gender Gap Report-2015 highlights glaring gender inequality in India. With a score of 0.664 (0.00 = inequality, 1.00 = equality) India ranks 108 out of 145 countries.

 

Thanks again,

Swaroop


Swaroop Rawal
Re: A dream for equal education
by Swaroop Rawal - Tuesday, 5 April 2016, 5:04 AM
 

Dear Jackie,

Thanks a lot for your comments. I will check all the typos  and grammatical errors and post the paper ...hopefully by tomorrow. 

I have  a great knack of reading what is in mind and not what is written!!!! I remember when I was just about to courier the copy of my PhD dissertation, my husband asked me why I have written recourses instead of resources !!!! Just imagine my panic!!!! I sat and white-inked all the recourses and wrote resources...and there were a huge number of them....I bet Jack will have  a smile on his face as he reads this as he commented on that as my external examiner... 

any ways I will re and re-check.

lots of love, Swaroop

Swaroop Rawal
Re: A dream for equal education
by Swaroop Rawal - Wednesday, 6 April 2016, 6:08 PM
 

Dear Jackie, I have carried out all the corrections and replied to the comments made by Pip and Robyn. I had called Rushita to share with her the comments made by you all....she was so thrilled and excited. I really wish you could have heard her over the telephone....Rushita is a very intelligent girl. I always tell her that her eyes speak volumes...they don't twinkle they blaze. I wish you could meet her I know would love her....

Love, Swaroop

Picture of Jacqueline Delong
Re: A dream for equal education
by Jacqueline Delong - Wednesday, 6 April 2016, 7:35 PM
 

Hi, Swaroop. Good work. It reads much better. I did mention, 

"Contrary to the statement early in the paper, "By not doing so I hold myself guilty of not enabling my student-teachers’ ‘real’ life problems and struggle come to the forefront", I think that you, Swaroop, have accomplished just that, and Rushita, you have very clearly narrated your problems and struggles as well as those of your students. I think this point needs to be made near the end of the paper. The paper is a study in what can be accomplished despite overwhelming obstacles. A victory dance is in order." 

I still think that the conclusion could be strengthened with some thoughts on your influence on yourselves, on others and on social formations, such as your classes, your schools, your school systems and your country.


Love, Jackie

Swaroop Rawal
Re: A dream for equal education
by Swaroop Rawal - Thursday, 7 April 2016, 6:23 AM
 

Dear Jackie,

I will look into this today...see you in the evening.

Love, Swaroop

Swaroop Rawal
Re: A dream for equal education
by Swaroop Rawal - Thursday, 7 April 2016, 11:17 AM
 

Dear Jackie, Pip and Robyn,

I have added a few thoughts to conclude the paper so please read the paper attached here....

I hope you enjoy what I have written.....

Love, 

Swaroop

Picture of Pip Bruce Ferguson
Re: A dream for equal education
by Pip Bruce Ferguson - Sunday, 10 April 2016, 8:59 AM
 

Dear Swaroop and Rushita

Many thanks for your meticulous attention to points raised and for this final version, which I warmly recommend to the Editorial Board.

The additional thoughts at the end are great and the use of the religious references/story ties beautifully back to those you used at the start.

My warm congratulations to you both.

Love

Pip

Robyn Pound
Re: A dream for equal education
by Robyn Pound - Sunday, 10 April 2016, 10:39 AM
 
Swaroop, I have thoroughly enjoyed reading this paper again and couldn't help myself making comments in it by way of a dialogue.  There are a couple of minor clarifications (creeping perfectionism) but this is such an excellent example of living theory making a real difference on more levels than the immediate relationship with the collaborative partner.  Bye-the-way I especially loved some of the colloquialisms that were part of my life in New Zealand  but I can't recall hearing here in England. Small world... chock-a-block, ruckus.  I believe there are many words like this we have absorbed as our own from India!  Please keep the realness.  I have attached my comments from my latest read you will see I am learning as I read, showing how much more I gained.

I wholeheartedly congratulate Rushita and you for an excellent paper that I think is ready for publication.

Swaroop Rawal
Re: A dream for equal education
by Swaroop Rawal - Monday, 18 April 2016, 8:20 AM
 

Dearest Robyn and Pip,

Thanks for your reply. I am so happy you enjoyed reading my paper.  I have a huge smile on my face.

Robyn thanks for your corrections... we will carry them out immediately....I read out all the comments that were relevant to Rushita before making the changes, as I have to be in sync with her...

Some answers to questions raised by you...and this is such a lovely conversation, I thank you- Robyn, Pip and Jackie, for it.

Comment 1 corrected

Comment 2- What I want to say is that they did not write of their own accord, they were not motivated enough to write...it had to be imposed.

Comment 3 It is a National scheme  ...so it is all over  ..saying places would not be correct..

Comment 4- it concerns teachers ...not young ones/ girls/ students/ but adults..men and women...so I should change.. does what she is told...to..... does what she/he is told....

Comment 6 - corrected

Comment -7 yes not Bold... corrected

Comment 8- It takes a while...but usually the family gets used to their children ‘speaking’... I believe because the transformation is not sudden. It is usually over a period of two years or so. Robyn I will send you another paper where I have shown how the girls went on to changing their villages etc...

Comment 9 – Even I have worked with the marginalised children when so often I have heard..no one has ever asked us what we liked !!!

Comment 12 – Yes, when Rushita narrated this incident to me I had goose bumps...imagine empowering girls in this manner... imagine giving all of them a voice...I love Rushita’s ...it is  a story that has to be told!

Comment 14- Rushita and I don’t think ‘community’ is applicable here...as Rushita’s story will be shared with the KGBV world.

Comment 15- No, I have not been attacked nor confronted for my ideas... but I am a bit wary as I have experienced severe criticism from professionals in education in Mumbai...mostly because I did not start of my career as a teacher or educator. You see some hated the fact that an actress could become an educator. They forget a wonderful educator –Dorothy Heathcote who went to study acting / theatre and then became a pioneering teacher.

 

Thanks a lot again,

Love, Swaroop


Picture of Pip Bruce Ferguson
Re: A dream for equal education
by Pip Bruce Ferguson - Monday, 18 April 2016, 10:58 AM
 

Dear Swaroop

I do appreciate the meticulousness of your addressing reviewer comments. As I said in my previous post, I recommend its publication to the Editorial Board.

I think this is a paper that will well inspire others. Congratulations to you and Rushita on this work.

Love

Pip

Swaroop Rawal
Re: A dream for equal education
by Swaroop Rawal - Monday, 18 April 2016, 12:02 PM
 

Dear Pip,

Thank you very much,

Love, Rushita and Swaroop

Picture of Jacqueline Delong
Re: A dream for equal education
by Jacqueline Delong - Tuesday, 19 April 2016, 7:35 PM
 

Hi, Swaroop. In this article, I think you and Rashita have made a significant contribution to the knowledge base of teaching and learning. Your corrections have helped the article to read smoothly and the additions in the conclusion have brought the central argument of the research full circle. Well done.


Love, Jackie

Swaroop Rawal
Re: A dream for equal education
by Swaroop Rawal - Wednesday, 20 April 2016, 8:04 AM
 

Thanks a lot Jackie. Pip's Robyn, and your constructive comments were efficacious, as were Moira's initial comments.

We thank you ...all.

Love, Rushita and Swaroop